Beat Bulletin January 2017

Beat Bulletin January 2017

Dear SAMRO Member,

It’s hard to believe that the first month of 2017 is almost over. Not so long, we were celebrating the New Year and making all sorts of resolutions to guide us throughout the year. After the success of our two music industry round-table discussions, we are happy to announce that the third instalment of this is heading to Emnotweni in Mpumalanga. It has always been our objective to host meaningful events around the country with the sole mandate of disseminating important industry information and sharing it with those who need it. We cannot wait to interact with the Mpumalanga music creators, publishers and music users.

All the way from Limpopo in a small village called Ga-Matipane near Tzaneen, Malatji is a one talented artist who prides himself in singing his compositions mainly using his mother tongue, Khelobedu. Since his introduction to the music industry with his well packaged contemporary afro jazz sound, Malatji has had a fair share of music awards nominations including, the South African Music Awards and Metro FM Music Awards. Recently, Beat Bulletin had an opportunity to sit with the musician and talk about his musical career, from being signed to Sony, going independent and singing in his mother tongue.

Afro-pop songstress, Bulelwa Mkutukana best known as Zahara is undoubtedly one of the best talented female vocalists in South Africa. Having been discovered by independent label, TS Record, the talent fast cemented her way in the mainstream music industry with her first album, Loliwe. We share details of our chat with the multi-award-winning artist, talking about her music career, comeback album after her name made headlines for all the wrong reasons and why she prefers working with producers, Robbie Malinga and Mojalefa Thebe. 

With more people spending time on the internet, it is undoubtedly becoming difficult for a music talent to ignore the social media phenomena. So how can a talent use social media effectively? It is no secret that the music industry has evolved over the years and in today’s world, internet has become a very important tool that music talents should embrace. Social media reigns supreme when it comes to sharing information and expressing yourself as an artist. This article looks at ways that an artist can benefit from using social media. It is worth taking a look at if you want to get an insight on how you can promote your craft using this platform.

Good news for those studying music. The SAMRO Foundation is inviting aspiring musicians to apply for music study bursaries. In 2016, the Foundation awarded bursaries worth over R1 million to music students. If you are in need of funds to further your music studies, then check what is required to apply for this bursary. The deadline for the submission of bursary applications is 31 March 2017. 

We would also like to introduce you to DALRO, one of our subsidiaries. DALRO is a non-profit organisation that provides licensing solutions that allow companies to use copyright-protected words and images. Read more about this organisation in this edition of Beat Bulletin. 

Until then, let the music play.

Tiyani Maluleke 
General Manager: Marketing & Communications

3RD SA MUSIC INDUSTRY ROUND-TABLE GOES TO MPUMALANGA

After the success of the two Music Industry Round-Table discussions which were held in Johannesburg and Cape Town in 2016, we are taking the third leg of this much needed music industry discussion to Mpumalanga. 

The session will be held at the Southern Sun Hotel in Emnotweni, Mpumalanga on Friday, 03 March 2017 and will start at 10h30 until 14h00.

The Music Industry Round-Table concept came to life after SAMRO saw the need to initiate meaningful discussions that will assist with the input and development of the South African music industry. With no proper platforms that facilitate consistent engagement amongst those who contribute to the wellbeing of the local music industry, there was a great need to establish this platform.

With the 2016 round-tables, SAMRO was able to initiate an effective platform for key music industry personnel to engage with one another and discuss various challenges facing the industry as a whole. So successful, some of the industry individuals who were part of these two sessions included SABC’s Kaizer Kganyago, Nomvuyiso Batyi from ICASA, Nkosinathi Mbelu who is Head of Music at the Gauteng based commercial station Kaya FM, SAMRO acting CEO – Rev. Abe Sibiya, well known music producer Thabiso ‘Thasman’ Tsotetsi and legendary kwaito artist, Arthur Mafokate who is also a SAMRO board member. 

The Mpumalanga leg will focus on music consumption in South Africa, platforms used to get the music to the consumers and available promotion avenues. The discussion will also touch on the topical issue of music airplay, quotas and the undeniable metamorphosis of genres and musical influences that is being experienced all over the world. Like in the past round-table discussions, SAMRO acting CEO, Rev. Abe Sibiya will also be part of the panel, sharing his industry knowledge and more information about SAMRO.

“Having hosted two successful music industry round-tables last year, we are delighted to be taking this initiative to Mpumalanga where the selected panellists who are experts in the subject matter to be discussed on the day can share with the audience their opinions so that we can find solutions for issues affecting the industry. Like the Johannesburg and Cape Town sessions, we are expecting Mpumalanga music talents who are SAMRO members to join us for a meaningful robust discussion,” says Tiyani Maluleke, SAMRO’s General Manager of Marketing.

The ground-breaking proclamation by the South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC), of broadcasting 90% local music content across its 18 radio stations, will also be unpacked. 

If you are in Mpumalanga, this is your opportunity to engage with SAMRO in matters relating to membership and royalties. 

For more information, contact the Marketing Department on 011 712 8521 or email marketing@samro.org.za

MALATJI PRIDES HIMSELF IN SINGING IN HIS MOTHER’S TONGUE

All the way from Limpopo in a small village called Ga-Matipane near Tzaneen, Malatji is one talented artist who prides himself in singing his compositions mainly using his mother tongue, Khelobedu. 

MALATJI PRIDES HIMSELF IN SINGING IN HIS MOTHER’S TONGUE

Since his introduction to the music industry with his well packaged contemporary afro jazz sound, Malatji has had a fair share of music awards nominations including, the South African Music Awards and Metro FM Music Awards. Not only has the talent gone to sign with one of the biggest labels in the world, Sony Music, he has also had a privilege to work with popular jazz musician, Selaelo Selota on his albums, "Stories Lived" & "Told and Azanian Songbook".

Recently, Beat Bulletin had an opportunity to sit with the musician and talk about his musical career, from being signed to Sony, going independent and many other industry related issues.

Question: Let’s take it back to the beginning, what inspired you to pursue music as a career?
Answer: Music was the only thing I know and love with all my heart. I had no option but to take this route. 

Q: How was the journey like, when wanting to get into the industry?
A: It was a bumpy ride. I remember sleeping under a bridge in downtown Jozi so that I could submit my demo in the morning.

Q: You were once signed to Sony, how did that happen?
A: I was lucky to meet Selaelo Selota at the Puisano Jazz programme, an initiative by the Gauteng Department of Sports, Arts, Culture and Recreation. He felt he couldn’t do my project alone and suggested that Sony would be the ideal partner and it so happened that Sony liked my music, and we worked well together.

Q: You have continued to predominately sing in your mother tongue; how has this move helped you to get into the mainstream music industry?
A: Balobedu are humble people and that inspired me to sing in Khelobedu. There’s not much competition singing in Khelobedu, especially in my genre and this adds a special magic to my music. I get great pleasure in preserving the language of the royal rain-making queen, Queen Modjadji.

Q: You have been nominated for both SAMAs and Metro FM Music Awards, what do you think makes your music stand out?
A: My music is new. I have not known anyone that does it in Khelobedu like the way I do it. It’s a mixture of old Khelobedu folk songs that I translate into afro jazz. It is indeed unique and special.

Q: With so much music piracy and drop in CD sales, how do you keep the business side of your career afloat?
A: By going to the people more often. There’s still a lot of good music buyers and lovers of our music. As a musician, all I need to do is to go to where the people are at and sell them my music.

Q: How long have you been a SAMRO member for? And why was it important for you to apply for membership?
A: I have been a SAMRO member for 13 years, from when I was still a member of my first group Labantu. And yes, it is highly important for every artist to join SAMRO so that they can be able to earn royalties when their music is played on radio and television. My career is safe and my children, and their children will continue benefitting from my work. 

ZAHARA STILL HITTING THE RIGHT NOTE

Afro-pop songstress, Bulelwa Mkutukana best known as Zahara is undoubtedly one of the best talented female vocalists in South Africa. 

ZAHARA STILL HITTING THE RIGHT NOTE

Having been discovered by independent label, TS Record, the talent fast cemented her way in the mainstream music industry with her first album, "Loliwe".

Three albums later, the East London born is still going strong, regardless of the bad publicity she attracted along her musical career. After reclaiming her place in 2015 with her album, "Country Girl", it is clear that Zahara understands her market and knows exactly which buttons to push to stay relevant.

Here’s our chat with the multi-award-winning artist, talking about her music journey, comeback album after her name made headlines for all the wrong reasons and why she prefers working with Robbie Malinga and Mojalefa Thebe.

Question: You have released three albums and each of them elevated your brand, how do you keep your music relevant and appealing?
Answer: I write about my life experiences and what I see around me, that's why the fans are able to connect with my music.

Q: Before releasing your last album, Country Girl, there were so many negative reports about your personal life. Were you not concerned at the time that those reports would dent the good brand you have built?
A: Yes, I was worried about those negative reports and what people would think of me. But I knew it will never break me because it’s God that has put me where I am.

Q: Musically, how do you ensure that you are always presenting a sound that your fans can relate to?
A: When I write my songs, I already have the melody in my head; I don't focus too much on the genre, I simply go with the flow and how the song plays out in my head.

Q: Music business can be cruel, where do you draw the inspiration and gather strength not to give up?
A: Firstly, I'm a believer and I trust in the Almighty God. I get a lot of support from my family, and my team. My supporters are a constant reminder why I am in the music industry.

Q: What are the most important lessons you have learned since breaking into the mainstream with your very first album?
A: Love what you do and don't put fame first. I have also learned to take pride in what I do.

Q: As a musician, you have been working with producers such as Robbie Malinga and Mojalefa Thebe. Why have you stayed with these two producers throughout?
A: Because they understand my life, the style of music I want and are visionaries.

Q: What message would you give to up and coming talents?
A: Love what you do, get the necessary information about the industry, be willing to work hard for what you believe in and never ever give up on your dreams, your time will come.

ARTISTS: HOW TO USE SOCIAL MEDIA EFFECTIVELY

It is no secret that the music industry has evolved over the years and in today’s world, the internet has become a very important tool that music talents should also use to get their brands to the world. 

USE SOCIAL MEDIA EFFECTIVELY

One of the most important parts of the marketing tools in recent years is social media; Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr and many others. More and more people are spending a significant amount of time online and it has become a norm for businesses and individuals to have an online presence. Social media has enabled music talents to reach far more people than they would when using traditional means of promoting their music.

While there can never be a right or wrong way to update and send out messages on social media platforms, there are a few pointers that one can look at.

1. Present yourself the way you would like to be perceived.
Always remember the bottom line, you are there to promote your brand and everything that comes with it. Stick to that! Don’t fake it, be who you are, there’s nothing wrong with sharing personal stories that relate to your music. 

2. Use your social platforms to showcase your talents.
If you have a new single, you should be able to let people listen to it than to simply talking about it without referencing. If you will be performing at an event, taking pictures with your fans and uploading a short video of your performance allows you to connect with your fans. Let platforms be about showcasing what you are capable of.

3. Don’t overdo things or oversell yourself
Some people find it annoying to receive or see constant updates from one individual. As a talent, package your messages with substance, don’t just publish something because you feel like it. Always remember, reputation matters.

4. Don’t force people to follow you or like your page.
If indeed you are as talented as you say, it is only a matter of time before people start paying attention. It is important to always remember that besides being an artist, you are a human being as well. 

5. Understand that different platforms reach different audiences.
You’ll have to spend some time thinking about who your ideal audience is and which social media platforms to use the most. Spend some time looking at how talents who are already in the mainstream do it and the kind of audience they target on different social media platforms.

6. Always remember that content is king.
Keep your fans interested in your page with the quality of content you post. Without good content, you might as well not be on social media. Remember, you are there to showcase your musical prowess. 

SAMRO MUSIC BURSARIES FOR STUDENTS AT SOUTH AFRICAN UNIVERSITIES

During 2016, the SAMRO Foundation awarded bursaries worth over R1 million to music students, with an online tool streamlining the applications and adjudication. 

Deadline for Bursary Applications: 31 March 2017

One of the recipients, a student from Swaziland in her second year at UKZN, Gcina Mavuso, wrote: “Words cannot describe the joy this news has brought me and my family. This is going to change my family’s financial status for the better. The money is going to make a huge difference since my fees will be reduced by R10 000. I would love to thank SAMRO for this wonderful gift.”

Each year, the SAMRO Foundation invites applications for bursaries for music studies. The SAMRO Foundation accepts applications from full-time students, registered at a South African university in their 2nd, 3rd and 4th years, or honours and masters degrees who are citizens of South Africa, Botswana, Lesotho or Swaziland and are studying for a degree or diploma majoring in music. Each bursary is worth R10 000.

Due to limited resources, the Foundation cannot support students from private higher education institutions; university students in their 1st year of study; students in foundation or bridging programmes; students specialising in Musical Theatre or Music Therapy and Doctoral level students.

The Application Form:

Before applicants start to fill in the form, they must please ensure that the browsers they are using are up to date. They should also source following digital documents that will need to be uploaded separately before submitting the application:

• Copy of ID Document
• Proof of 2017 registration
• 2016 examination results or most recent academic record (university transcript) 
• 2 Letters of reference (not older than 3 months)

For Masters Applicants we require a 5 to 8 page synopsis of your thesis or dissertation. Please ensure that all scans are clear and legible before sending.

SAMRO Foundation request that all communications including reference letters be provided in English. Please only submit what has been requested. Additional material will be discarded.

Applications will not be considered if:

• any section of the form is incomplete
• supporting documents are missing
• more than one proposal is submitted per student
• the application is submitted after the deadline of 31 March 2017

Terms and conditions:

• The decisions of the independent adjudication panel will be final, subject only to confirmation by SAMRO Foundation’s Board
• Awarded bursaries will be communicated to the relevant Heads of Department and paid directly to the relevant universities for the relevant year.
• Bursaries are restricted to the degrees/diplomas stated in the applications and may not be transferred to other degrees/diplomas
• Bursary awards are for payment of tuition fees only
• Bursaries may only be used in the academic year in which they are awarded

For further information, please email: anriette.chorn@samro.org.za or naseema.yusuf@samro.org.za

INTRODUCING DALRO

DALRO, one of our subsidiaries, is a non-profit organisation that provides licensing solutions to allow companies to use copyright-protected words and images. 

DARLO

Who is DALRO?
We are a non -profit organisation that provides simple licensing solutions to allow companies to use copyright-protected words and images. Fees from licences are paid to our creator members. Copyright-protected works include, published books, newspapers, magazines and scientific journals.

What is copying?
Copying can be anything from photocopying articles to scanning and emailing them to colleagues or clients as well as hosting articles on your shared drive or intranet for others to view or, externally, on your corporate website and Facebook pages. This also includes printing out or emailing articles you receive from your PR or media monitoring agency.

Is my organisation infringing copyright?
The basic rule is that any organisation that wishes to copy a published work will need permission from the copyright owner. If your organisation reproduces, either in print or digitally, articles and shares these internally or externally, it is likely infringing copyright if it does not possess a licence.

Why do companies need to get a DALRO Business Licence?
Our role is to make the process of gaining copyright approval from individual publishers easier. Our licences act as an insurance policy that protects organisations from breaching copyright. They also provide assurance that publishers are being rewarded for their work and effort.

Even if I buy the book?
Purchasing a copy of a work, such as a book, scientific journal, magazine or a newspaper, does not give the buyer the right to make any copyright-sensitive use of that work. Copyright law dictates that the purchased copy may be read or otherwise enjoyed, and may be re-sold, given away or destroyed, but the work embodied in the copy may not be reproduced, publicly performed. 

I have a subscription for the publication. Why do I need a licence?
Organisations run on information, so it makes sense that activities involving sharing and storing articles are part of your everyday business routine. But sharing and storing activities are not covered by your subscription. Your company needs permission from the owner of the works. We have been mandated by publishers to give permission in a form of a licence.

But is information not free?
The royalties collected by us find their way back to the rights’ owners, the people who have, through their mental efforts, created the intellectual property. Without reimbursement, they have little incentive to go on creating, and there would be no information. In any case, no photocopied page is free: you pay for the paper, the ink, the toner and the use of the machine. When you pay a copyright fee as well, you also pay for the content - arguably the most valuable part of the photocopied page.

Contact DALRO at dalro@dalro.co.za to enquire about their comprehensive business licence or visit www.dalro.co.za for more information. 

MO FLAVA GIVES AWAY BURSARIES TO STUDY MUSIC PRODUCTION

As primary and high school pupils go back to school, Metro FM on-air talent and club DJ, Moeti Tsiki better known as Mo Flava is going an extra mile to ensure that he help those in need. 

MO FLAVA GIVES AWAY BURSARIES TO STUDY MUSIC PRODUCTION

For the 7th year running, Mo Flava is set to give away 10 bursaries once again this year to potential students with a minimum diploma entry matric certificate through Boston Media House.

If you are interested in studying Radio, TV, Music Production and Graphic design, you could stand a chance to receive a bursary from the DJ.

So how do you exactly stand a chance of getting this bursary?

Final leg of candidate interviews will be held at the Sandton Boston Media House campus on 28 January 2017, starting from 9hAM to 4hPM.