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  • The Beat Bulletin
  • NOVEMBER 2015

Dear SAMRO Member,

Welcome to another edition of the Beat Bulletin. It’s been a great year for South African music with a number of our local artists doing amazing work.  From several artists developing live performance circuits overseas and winning international awards, to Cassper Nyovest achieving his dream of filling up The Dome. In this last edition of 2015, we shift the focus to music education.

Check out the overview article about the importance of music education by Jonathan G Shaw - a music business consultant, lecturer at Wits University and author of the textbook “The South African Music Business”.

We also speak to renowned composer and guitarist Concord Nkabinde, an avid advocate for music education, who shares his musical journey and shed light on the importance of music education in South Africa.

You may also want to read about the amazing work that the Red Bull Music Academy (RBMA) is doing in the space of artist development.  If you want to find out how you can be a part of the worldwide network of the RBMA initiative, then take a moment to read this article.

Caiphus Semenya was selected as the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award for Music at this year’s Arts & Culture Trust (ACT) Awards, a SAMRO sponsored category. Congratulations to this Mr Semenya, South Africa is hounoured to have a musical giant of your calibre. Our huge congratulations also go out to two time Wawela Music Awards nominee, Lindiwe Maxolo who won the 2015 Music ImpACT Award.

Take a moment to also read the profile of Brenden Praise, a young vocalist from Mpumalanga who has already gained the respect of many music lovers. The talented vocalist became a household name in 2013 when he was the runner-up on the popular reality singing show, SA Idols.

In an effort to promote artist development, the upcoming Maftown Heights festival recently announced the winners of their a fan driven competition, a social media campaign aimed at giving  “New Kids On The Block (#NKOTB)” a chance to perform on the festival stage alongside some of the biggest hip – hop artists in the game. This is a great initiative and we wish to congratulate the 3 winners.

Don’t forget to look at the long list of upcoming events for December and remember to continue supporting South African music.

Yours in music,

Tiyani Maluleke

GM Marketing

In this issue
SAMRO AGM COMING UP
THE IMPORTANCE OF MUSIC EDUCATION - BY JONATHAN SHAW
CONCORD NKABINDE GIVING BACK THROUGH MUSIC EDUCATION
RED BULL MUSIC ACADEMY NURTURING THE WORLD’S MUSIC TALENTS
MAFTOWN HEIGHTS ANNOUNCES NEW KIDS ON THE BLCOK WINNERS
CAIPHUS SEMENYA RECEIVES THE ACT/SAMRO LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
BRENDEN LETTING HIS MUSIC SPEAK FOR ITSELF
SAMRO SA GIG GUIDE

SAMRO AGM COMING UP

This year's AGM is set to take place on 27 November 2015 at SAMRO's head office in Braamfontein, Johannesburg.

In preparation for the upcoming meeting members were sent communication pertaining to important documentation that is required leading up to the event including: the official AGM Notice, the proxy form as well as the summarised financials.

Do you have questions that you would like to be raised at the AGM? Please send any queries or questions relating to the AGM to secretary@samro.org.za.

It was also communicated that for the second year running, we will be streaming the AGM live online. Members who are unable to attend the meeting in person are urged to use this platform to engage with the AGM process and submit any questions in regard to what is being discussed at the AGM. 

Should you wish to stream the AGM, please contact our customer services on 086 117 2676 or email: customerservices@samro.org.za and one of our customer services consultants will be able to assist you.

 

THE IMPORTANCE OF MUSIC EDUCATION - BY JONATHAN SHAW

One of my long-standing regrets is not having had formal music education....

I took lessons with various music teachers growing up, and have made a fairly successful business actually making music (to the point of composing orchestral pieces and so on), but I don’t have a piece of paper showing that I’m fully ‘qualified’ to do so. 

When I was deciding what to study at University, I was told that music was not a viable career. Yet here I am, and I can officially and categorically say that those people were wrong. 

Just like any other career, be it accounting or medicine, you may have a chance if you can add up some numbers or spot a rash but there is a mountain of information that you are probably unaware of that you’ll need in order to compete with an educated professional. Having a business in music is no different, except everyone is a critic and not a patient. 

Some may consider bad music a serious crime against humanity, but being an art and a skill, it is by no means limited to the rigid regulations other professions may endear. So, the urban legend of someone striking it big with little or no skill is not unheard of. Except that these are often products manufactured by the record business and if you are to have a sustained career you’ll need to cover yourself by getting wise to the workings of the biz.

In my research paper, Meanderings for the Music Industry, we pointed out three areas of study that one needs. The first is actual music training, which consists of music theory and performance. Besides its many positive factors for child-development, as a professional this helps you speak the same musical language and improves workflow interaction, as well as understanding technique and musical trends. 

Secondly, there are the technical aspects of modern music production, such as sound engineering and audio technology. I can personally relate to this, as many musicians often bring audio projects to me that, to say the least, require more work to get them up to spec than if they understood how best to start it in the first place. With technology the way it is, you can’t afford not to understand these things if you are making music in one form or another. 

Lastly, you need to have some business background to really bring it all together. No good getting the gig, being able to set up that outdoor line array, only to not get paid at the end, right? Unfortunately this often comes down to working musicians simply saying “no, I’m not performing unless you sign a contract and pay a deposit”. You don’t walk out the grocery store without paying for the goods first, so why do I hear complaints about musicians getting paid months after or not even at all? Well, I digress, but business savvy does start with business information leading to business confidence. 

Many music qualifications will have a mix of these three areas and depending on your aptitude, you’ll pick one stream of study over another. My first-hand experience has been the business side of music, stemming from having formal qualifications in Business Sciences myself. I lecture two part-time courses in music business at Wits Plus as well as the business module at fourth year level on the Bachelor of Music degrees at Wits University School of the Arts. SAMRO offers a bursary to those who would like to study these courses at Wits Plus. I’m also currently studying my Masters in Arts and Culture Management at Wits too, which was cool for me to swing from the School of Business Economics over to the arts in my studies. You may consider UNISA’s WIPO course in intellectual property or Henley Business School’s MBA in Creative & Music Business. So this gives you some idea of where you might land up if business is your direction. 

Today, audio engineering studies are very popular, with a lot of tertiary institutions offering various courses. Some of the top institutions to consider are:  The Academy of Sound Engineering, Emendy Sound and Music Technology College, SAE Institute, City Varsity, College SA, Cape Audio College, Oakfields College, Damelin, South West Media College… heck, google it!

My first piece of advice to parents is - get your kid doing their grades formally; this opens the door for them to enter further studies in music. I’ve mentioned that one can get a degree in music from a university, but you could also consider further studies through Campus of Performing Arts, Central Johannesburg College, South West Gauteng College, Boston City Campus, National School of the Arts, South African Music Institute, Magnet Schools or even find a local music teacher in your area, either privately or at a school. 

Through its CSI wing, The SAMRO Foundation, SAMRO also offers bursaries in music education. My dream is to get this qualification, but maybe by that time I’d have hit even bigger plateaus of music success and they’ll award me an Honorary Doctorate… okay, I can dream can’t I? “Free education” perhaps? *wink*

Jonathan G Shaw is a music business consultant, lecturer at Wits University and author of the textbook “The South African Music Business”. His other personality is a successful recording studio owner, recording engineer and producer. 

Visit www.shawmusicstudios.co.za and www.ibilion.com

 

CONCORD NKABINDE GIVING BACK THROUGH MUSIC EDUCATION

Concord Nkabinde is one of the most respected musicians in South Africa with a proven track record of working with some of the biggest artists in the country.

Bass guitarist, Musical Director, Composer, Arranger and record label owner are the multitude of hats Nkabinde wears from day to day. With a Bachelor’s Degree in Music, Nkabinde is passionate about music education, having worked as full time music teacher. 

When he’s not touring the world, sharing his gift of music, the Soweto born composer makes it his mission to participate in music industry conferences and workshops. This is where he’s able to share the invaluable lessons he’s learned over the years about the music industry, more specifically the importance of music education.

We recently caught up with the talented musician during his busy schedule, to talk about his music career so far and all things related to the music business and the importance of music education in this ever evolving industry. 

Q: Tell us a bit about your musical background.

A: Born and raised in Soweto, I grew up surrounded by music as both my immediate family and extended family were very musically inclined. The church also played a very crucial role in helping me develop an ear for improvised music. Picking up music was very organic for me. 

I began to feel a strong pull towards spending more time with music when I was in matric. But it was a difficult time especially growing up in a society that didn’t believe that music was a viable career option.  It was my passion for music, coupled with my youthful arrogance that made me want to explore this “pull”. 

The only way I could canvas support for the pursuit of my passion was to take the path of tertiary music studies. So I went on to study towards a Bachelor of Music in Jazz Studies Degree at the University of KwaZulu Natal. The rest, as they say, is history. 

The years of studying full-time exposed me to so many networks, local & international, that continue to enrich my musical career today. 

Q: You have been in the industry for quite a while now, how has the journey been so far?

A: The journey so far has been a sobering one. Lots of ups and lots of downs, like life itself. There is nothing that would have given me more balance than living a life of being celebrated on big world stages and then coming home to deal with the day to day struggles of life. Being grounded is what helped me stay sane and consistent through both extremes.  

I have also learned that the journey is not about music or the notes we play. There has to be a deeper purpose. Throughout our careers, we continue to fine-tune and even re-define that purpose. 

Q:  Do you think there’s still a need for artists to release full length albums in this day and age where sales of physical copies are declining?

A: Definitely yes. There is still room for and interest in physical sales, especially in Africa. It is important for us to pay attention to who is telling us that physical sales are on their way out. These are people who want to see physical sales disappear because that used to be their biggest cash-cow but not anymore due to: 

-The growth of independent artists. 

-Cheaper and more accessible technology (Studios, Printing and Pressing).

-Social Media opportunities

- Media embracing the Artist (“Underdog”) more and more. 

This doesn’t suggest that the digital route should be overlooked. We actually have to keep our feet in both worlds as artists, in order to cater for a broader audience. There are still many music lovers who relish the experience of having a physical copy and listening to the story that a full length album has to offer. A story that involves sound, picture, texture, words and written stories they can read. 

Now that CD stores are shutting down, our physical sales as independent artists are actually increasing. People can buy directly from an artist and get an autographed copy that can be delivered at their doorstep. We also deal with smaller CD stores as well as stores that may not necessarily be music stores as distribution outlets. That’s what it means to be creatively independent.

Q:  How important is it for an artist to be able to play a musical instrument? 


A: The best way to answer that question would be, if your general knowledge and experiences are broader, you stand a good chance of achieving depth in anything you do. So if you are, for example, a school teacher who is also tuned into youth culture, I am of the belief that you will teach young learners more effectively. If you are a singer and you can play piano, you will have an advantage of understanding harmony and pitch better. If you are a drummer who also plays guitar, your contribution to the music will be more than just that of rhythm. 

The lesson here is to never stop learning and broadening your general knowledge of what happens in your area of interest.

Q:  The music industry is evolving every day, how do you keep your brand and music relevant?

A: Staying connected to the youth and the energy they bring is very important.  I try to ensure that my music speaks to a purpose and comes from a place of connectedness with the very people who will consume it. I also keep pushing myself towards embracing new technology.   

Q:  Why is it important for one to be equipped with music industry business knowledge?

A: Logically, it doesn’t make sense to claim that you are passionate about something, yet you do not know much about it. How do you expect to maximise a space you do not understand? We live in a period where most information is within reach, so there is no excuse. 

Q: What made you decide to get involved in the space of music education?

A: I believe that it is engrained in us to give. Unless we give, something in us dies. It’s always amazing how much we receive when we choose to give. 

When I think of how much I have learnt from established musicians when I was starting out, I can’t help but wonder how younger musicians of today learn. Yes they have access to the internet today, but having information on one hand and practical experience on the other are two different things. 

We need to help young people strike a balance between exploring new methods/spaces and under-scoring that with practical experience. 

It pains me to see musicians tirelessly working so hard but actually shooting in the dark because they have no knowledge of the most basic things when it comes to how the music industry works. We need to change that. The younger generation has newer challenges that we may not have experienced. So it makes sense that we empower them with all the tools they need in order for them to have the confidence to tackle today’s challenges. 

Working with young people also injects me with new energy and it keeps me in the loop with newer trends and directions. 

Q:  A lot of artists today are finding collaboration with talents of a different genre more appealing, is this something you are looking at doing in the near future? 


A: I would not say most artists are doing this. Many avoid it and stick to their comfort zones. The trend internationally is that of finding partnerships or collaborations with “unlikely” partners. Fortunately music can interact with any and everything. Yes this is something I have been exploring. To date I have collaborated with dancers, beatboxers, orchestras, solo performers, organisations and more. The possibilities are endless.

Q:  What are your thoughts around putting together your own events instead of waiting for a booking?

A: Producing or organising our own events as artists IS THE FUTURE. 

We have now been exposed to what it takes to organise and market an event. We now know what the expenses and profits can be. We also know how much we have historically been paid in relation to the profits made by the organisers. So we are exploring that space, starting with small gigs and building from there. Cassper Nyovest filling up the Dome might be an extreme example to quote, but his success has made an impact on how many artists think about themselves. It also gave a wakeup call to big traditional sponsors as to how the sponsorship game could be changing. 

Q: What are the most important lessons learned in your early days in the mainstream music industry?

A: Lessons learnt are so many and they include: 

-In the music industry things and people aren’t always what they seem. Hype is used to sell the product but be careful not to believe in your own hype. 

-The best way to network, is not to look for people who can do something for you and your business. You will grow meaningful networks when you go out looking for people in whose lives and businesses you can contribute. 

-If I want to remain relevant as a musician, hunger for general knowledge and information can be much more important than the daily practicing of musical scales. 

Q:  Lastly, what is the importance of being a SAMRO member?

A: SAMRO plays a very crucial role as an important link in the music industry’s value chain. SAMRO is our connection for collection of performance royalties both nationally and internationally. 

It does not make sense that you would put your music out there but not be part of a system that is designed to collect your money from the usage of that music. Being a member of SAMRO has also taught me a lot with regards to how the broader South African music industry is structured and how it can work for me.

 

 

 

RED BULL MUSIC ACADEMY NURTURING THE WORLD’S MUSIC TALENTS

In the music business, everything starts with a song. Without great music that appeals to broader fans, there is certainly no music business.

Founded in 1998, the Red Bull Music Academy is a world-traveling series of music workshops and festivals that offers aspiring artists who want to make a difference in the music landscape an opportunity to do so. 

The main five-week event is held in a different country each year. The public portion of its program is a festival of concerts, art installations, club nights and lectures by influential figures in contemporary music. There, sixty up and coming producers, singers, sound artists, DJs and musicians from around the world learn from and collaborate with top industry professionals.

Year-round, the Red Bull Music Academy maintains an online magazine, radio station (RBMA Radio) and lecture video archive. The Academy hosts additional music workshops, club nights and curates stages at festivals in around 60 countries worldwide.

The Academy was initiated in Berlin and to date it has travelled to Toronto, London, São Paulo, Seattle, Cape Town, Rome, London, Melbourne, New York, Madrid, Barcelona and Dublin. While the first few editions saw a greater emphasis on DJ culture, the programme and recording facilities now accommodate all genres and aspects of the music spectrum.

To be part of the RBMA, you need to apply. Prospective applicants are required to prepare a demo CD of their music - be it original productions or a DJ set. This demo must then be sent to RBMA head offices in Cologne, Germany along with a completed questionnaire. From these applications, 60 participants are selected. Two groups of 30 are then flown to the location of the respective year's event for one of two fortnightly “terms”. 

For two weeks, the participants have the opportunity work in up to twelve studios specially designed for each edition of the Red Bull Music Academy. Participants have access to a range of the latest gear as well as analogue equipment for music production and performance. There are no deadlines or set quotas, and Red Bull does not own the music produced in the building. These collaborative sessions are in part facilitated by the Academy’s "Studio Team", all experienced music producers in various fields. Twice daily, participants attend lectures by guest speakers who range from composers, producers, sound engineers and technological pioneers, to rappers and industry professionals. Lecture attendance is the only compulsory part of the program.

The Academy also publishes a yearly double-CD compilation of music produced in that year titled Various Assets – Not for Sale. Since 2004, those compilations have featured original music from more than 300 artists, including Dorian Concept, Flying Lotus, Lusine, Theo Parrish, Aloe Blacc, Mark Pritchard, XXXchange, Om’Mas Keith of Sa-Ra,Illuminated faces, Tony Allen, Mr Hudson, Dennis Coffey, Hudson Mohawke, DJ Zinc, Wally Badarou, Benga, Phonte, Jake One, Steve Spacek of Spacek, and Natalia Lafourcade.

The Red Bull Music Academy hosts additional workshops and three-day Base Camp sessions in more than 60 countries every year which resemble the actual Academy. There is a strong focus on local topics as well as an international perspective.

As a function of Red Bull Music Academy's efforts to create awareness for the Academy and promote its artists, Academy alumni also have further support, bookings and promotion through RBMA channels after the sessions are over. Many tours, local events and major festival bookings are pulled from the roster of past Red Bull Music Academy participants. 

 

MAFTOWN HEIGHTS ANNOUNCES NEW KIDS ON THE BLCOK WINNERS

Maftown Heights 2015 unearths new hip-hop talent with their #NKOTB competition

The upcoming Maftown Heights festival spiced up by KFC is set to take place on Friday, 27 November 2015, at Mary Fitzgerald Square, Johannesburg. In anticipation of this hip-hop extravaganza, the festival ran a fan driven competition on Twitter to give “New Kids On The Block (#NKOTB)” a chance to be added to this year’s Maftown Heights’ line-up, performing alongside some of South Africa’s and the continent’s biggest hip – hop acts such as HHP, Khuli Chana, AKA and KO.

From a shortlist of 9 #NKOTB finalists, Maftown Heights recently announced the top 3 winners who will perform at this year’s festival, after 14 049 accurate number of votes were cast over a period of 6 days. The winners are K2, Jay Makopo and Priddy Ugly. 

“As a festival we are always excited to see South Africa get behind an initiative aimed at unearthing the next wave of SA super stars! Thank you to every single person who voted for their favourite #NKOTB. A pity we can’t have all 9 on our stage this year as they all are special talents! Congrats to K2, Jay Mokopo and Priddy Ugly!” expressed Refiloe Ramogase – Dream Team SA Director and Maftown Heights co-founder.

Showcasing rising talent has been a standard feature at Maftown Heights since its inception in 2010 and the festival team is very proud to play a small part in uplifting talent by giving them this platform.

Get your tickets now to see SA’s rising stars perform at Maftown Heights.

 

CAIPHUS SEMENYA RECEIVES THE ACT/SAMRO LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

The Arts & Culture Trust (ACT) has named Caiphus Semenya the 2015 recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award for Music. This category was proudly sponsored by SAMRO.

Caiphus Katse Semenya was born on the 19th of August 1939 in Johannesburg’s Alexandra Township. Semenya is one of South Africa’s most prolific musical directors and composers. He also belongs to the collection of iconic South African musicians to have lived in exile – a group which included the likes of his wife Letta Mbulu, iconic jazz musician Hugh Masekela, celebrated legend Miriam Makeba, jazz maestro Jonas Gwangwa, and jazz pianist Abdullah Ibrahim. 

These artists used their craft as a tool for activism flying the anti-apartheid flag effectively abroad. Alongside Jonas and Hugh, Caiphus was a member of the Union of South Africa, a band considered to be one of the best South African musical exports of all time.

During his early teens, Semenya lived with his grandmother in Benoni where he was exposed to the sounds of musical works by Woody Woodpeckers and the Inkpots – who were on top of the music entertainment world at the time. Along with three of his friends, Caiphus, affectionately known as “Caution”, started a band called the Katzenjammer Kids which became one of South Africa’s top teenage groups. He was invited by Gibson Kente, the father of ‘Township Musical’, to join his production ‘Manana the Jazz Prophet’, where he met Theo Bophela who encouraged his song writing talents.

Semenya left for New York in 1964 with the musical Sponono and remained there when the rest of the cast returned to South Africa. He stayed in Miriam Makeba’s home and continued to compose music for many years.

Later he and his wife Letta, left New York for Los Angeles where his writing talents resulted in him working with some of the top music producers of the time such as the legendary Quincy Jones.

Songstress Sibongile Khumalo and actor Sisanda Henna announced this award.

Other Lifetime Achievement Award Winners include: Omar Badsha for Visual Art, Thembi Mtshali-Jones for Theatre, Don Mattera for Literature, Johnny Mekoa for Arts Advocacy and Alfred Hinkel for Dance.

 

BRENDEN LETTING HIS MUSIC SPEAK FOR ITSELF

Brenden Praise became a household name in 2013 when he was the runner-up on the popular reality singing show, South African Idols.

Born and raised in Graskop, Mpumalanga, Brenden Praise is a young talent in South Africa who has already gained the respect of many music lovers. 

A former member of a band called Soulfenda, Brenden plays the piano, bass guitar and drums – all self-taught. His vocal prowess and wide understanding of different musical styles have allowed the singer to excel at what he does best.

We sat with the artist to talk about his musical journey, his Idols experience and what his fans can look forward to in the coming year.

Q: You entered SA Idols in 2013 and made a great mark for yourself, how was the experience?

A:  It was a life changing experience for me because I was still trying to find myself as a person and it really just guided me into becoming the artist I am today.

Q: What are the most important lessons that you learned from the show?

A: I learned a lot but most importantly I gained some insight on how to perform and how to really connect with an audience. I also learned that if you are true to yourself confidently, the world will accept you.

Q: Since then, what have you been up to?

A: I've been touring the country and performing for all my fans from Idols. I have also been trying to get myself into the mainstream industry. I have been working really hard as a musician to better my craft. I want to use my talent to change people’s lives for the better. 

Q: As a songwriter, where do you draw your inspiration from?

A: I listen to a lot of music; I think sometimes I write as an extension of thoughts developed from the music I've listened to. Other times it is from personal experiences but mostly it's the general mood I'm in at the time.

Q: What’s your creative process for writing songs that cater to your target audience?

A: I don't really write for a certain target audience, I write things that I can be proud of and the rest I believe will follow.

Q: You are managed by Spirit Motion owned by house music duo Black Motion, why did you choose this label?

A: Spirit Motion has a great vision and it's one I felt honoured to be a part of. I had been a fan of Black Motion for a while so to work under their label for me was a no brainer.

Q: The music industry is a tough business, how do you keep your brand relevant and appealing?

A: I honestly just want to be myself and get my music out there. I am not much for brands or packaging myself in any other way but being myself.

Q: Most talents are embracing the power of social media, what's your take on using social media as a vehicle to push your music?

A: I think it's a great way of letting people know about my work, but my work should essentially speak for itself.

 

SAMRO SA GIG GUIDE

Here’s a look at all the upcoming events for the month of December and remember to keep supporting live events!

Francoise van Coke

Date: 03 December

Venue: All Star Theatre, Cape Gate

Time: 20h00 

Fee: R150

 

Total Black Out – Summertime Fun

Date: 03 December

Venue: E N R G Nightclub

Time: 21h00

Fee: R100 – R250

 

Mohlakeng Music in the Park

Date: 04 December

Venue: Kwantu Gardens, Mohlakeng

Time: 10h00

Fee: R50 – R100

 

Khaya Mthethwa - The Uprising

Date: 04 December

Venue: Durban Christian Centre Jesus Dome

Time: 20h00 

Fee: R200 – R350

 

Arno Carstens - Tulbagh

Date: 05 December

Venue: Church Street Garden

Time: 18h00

 

Vaal Hip Hop Fest

Date: 05 December

Venue: Dlomo Dam

Time: 12h00 

Fee: R120 – R250

 

Tubatse Summer Festival 

Date: 05 December

Venue: Laerskool Burgersfort Rugby Stadium

Time: 15h00

Fee: R100 – R250

 

Mafikizolo 

Date: 05 December

Venue: S A State Theatre - Pretoria

Time: 21h00

Fee: R150 – R250

 

Hugh Masekela Live!

Date: 05 December

Venue: The Boardwalk I C C - The Boardwalk Casino

Time: 18h30

Fee: R250 – R495

 

Moretele Park Hip Hop Festival

Date: 05 December

Venue: Moretele Park in Mamelodi

Time: 18h00

Fee: R150 – R350

 

Tshwane Pens Down and Up Fest

Date: 05 December

Venue: Temba Stadium

Time: 12h00

Fee: R150 – R600

 

Mi Casa Album Launch

Date: 06 December

Venue: Meropa Casino - Polokwane

Time: 16h00

Fee: R120

 

Shack Summer Festival

Date: 11 December

Venue: The Marksman Range – Cape Town

Time: 18h00 

Fee: R80 – R220

 

Cassper Nyovest - Pretoria

Date: 11 December

Venue: S A State Theatre, Opera - South African State

Time: 18h00

Fee: R150 – R250

 

BET Experience Africa Concert

Date: 12 December 2015

Venue: The Dome

Time: 12h00

Price: R 550

 

Indumezulu Music Festival

Date: 12 December

Venue: Ulundi Stadium - Durban

Time: 11h00

Fee: R100 – R200 

 

Willowmore Annual Summer Jam

Date: 12 December

Venue: Willowmore Park Grounds

Time: 12h00

Fee: R120 – R250

 

1st Annual Giyani Picnic Fest

Date: 12 December

Venue: Giyani Stadium

Time: 20h00

Fee: R80

 

DStv iRock Rustenburg

Date: 12 December

Venue: Olympia Park Stadium, Rustenburg

Time: 20h00

Fee: R150 – R650

 

MTN Joyous Celebration Vaal – Vanderbijlpark

Date: 12 December

Venue: Emerald Resort & Casino, E & E Centre

Time: 18h00

Fee: R50 – R500

 

Sixties Mahikeng

Date: 12 December

Venue: Monare Farm - Mafikeng

Time: 20h00

Fee: R180 – R950

 

Black Coffee Block Party

Date: 12 December

Venue: Mary Fitzgerald Square

Time: 12h00 

Fee: R206

 

Mahika Mahikeng-Motswako Festival

Date: 12 December

Venue: Lotlamoreng Dam - Mafikeng

Time: 18h00

Fee: R150

 

Umhlanga Food & Music Festival

Date: 12 December

Venue: Chris Saunders Park, Umhlanga

Time: 11h00

Fee: R120 – R150

 

Jozi Summer Shine Festival

Date: 13 December

Venue: Marks Park, Emmarentia

Time: 12h30 

Fee: R450 – R695

 

Klassieke Kersfees - Paarl

Date: 13 December

Venue: Liqui - Fruit Amphitheatre

Time: 18h30 

Fee: R130 – R180

 

Black Byrd in Stellenbosch

Date: 13 December

Venue: Oude Libertas Amphitheatre

Time: 18h30 

Fee: R190

 

Boyz II Men & Joe - Live in SA

Date: 15 December

Venue: Ticketpro Dome

Time: 19h00 

Fee: R555 - R1750

 

KentPhonik & Friends

Date: 15 December

Venue: Carfax - Carfax

Time: 18h00

Fee: R150

 

Redsquare DJ Knockout Challenge

Date: 16 December

Venue: Dickinson Park, Vereeniging

Time: 10h00

Fee: R60 – R120

 

Free State Beach Party

Date: 16 December

Venue: Kroonpark Resort

Time: 10h00

Fee: R130 – R400

 

All White Picnic at Plot 22

Date: 16 December

Venue: Plot 22 Pub and Grill - Johannesburg

Time: 12h00

Fee: R150 – R400

 

Day of Reconciliation Picnic 

Date: 16 December

Venue: Carnival City Casino and Entertainment World

Time: 10h00 

Fee: R185 | R500 VIP

 

Gugulethu Race + Music Festival

Date: 16 December

Venue: Ny 49 Stadium, Gugulethu

Time: 11h00

Fee: R70 – R120

 

A Christmas Celebration

Date: 18 December

Venue: Playhouse Opera Theatre

Time: 19h30

Fee: R100 – R220

 

Die Heuwels Fantasties - Jeffreysbaai

Date: 18 December

Venue: Jolly Dolphin

Time: 21h00

Fee: R100

 

Nathi Mankayi & Maleh

Date: 18 December

Venue: S A State Theatre, Opera

Time: 15h00

Fee: R150 – R250

 

Johnny Clegg Best Live & Unplugged

Date: 18 December

Venue: The White House Theatre

Time: 20h00

Fee: R355 – R395

 

Joyous 20 Live Recording

Date: 19 December

Venue: Moses Mabhida Stadium

Time: 14h00 

Fee: R280 - R650

 

Summer Music Explosion

Date: 19 December

Venue: Transka Resort, Warrenton

Time: 18h00

Fee: R100 – R400

 

Aquafest Beach Party

Date: 19 December

Venue: New Beach, Durban

Time: 14h00

Fee: R100 – R250

 

4th Annual Nabalabantfu Picnic

Date: 19 December

Venue: Elangeni Lodge

Time: 13h00

Fee: R100 – R500

 

Major League Gardens

Date: 19 December

Venue: Polokwane Rugby Fields

Time: 12h00

Fee: R150 – R500

 

2nd Annual Kwandebele Beach Festival

Date: 20 December

Venue: Kagiso Water Park

Time: 18h00

Fee: R30 – R550

 

The Real Unplugged Sessions with Prime Circle

Date: 20 December

Venue: The Venue Melrose Arch

Time: 19h00

Fee: R250

 

The Metro FM Heatwave

Date: 20 December

Venue: Alexander Golf And Country Club – East London

Time: 14h00

Fee: R160 – R600

 

DJ Shimza's 7th Annual One Man Show

Date: 25 December

Venue: Mehlareng Stadium

Time: 12h00 

Fee: R100 | VIP is R300

 

Phangweni Vibes 3rd Summer Festival

Date: 26 December

Venue: Lulekani Stadium – Phalaborwa

Time: 11h00 

Fee: R150 – R800

 

Goldfish - Jeffreysbaai

Date: 26 December

Venue: Jolly Dolphin

Time: 12h00

Fee: R130

 

Cosmo Beach Fest

Date: 26 December

Venue: Moyo Beach Bar + Pier, Ushaka

Time: 12h00

Fee: R150 

 

Robbie Wessels - Jeffreysbaai

Date: 27 December

Venue: Jolly Dolphin

Time: 21h00 

Fee: R120

 

Bobby Van Jaarsveld en Orkes

Date: 27 December

Venue: The Guild Theatre – East London

Time: 17h30 

Fee: R150

 

Amcor Dam Music Festival

Date: 27 December

Venue: Amcor Dam, Newcastle

Time: 10h00

Fee: R160 – R1000

 

Ebubeleni Music Festival

Date: 27 December

Venue: St Georges Cricket Ground

Time: 12h00

Fee: R160 – R700

 

Countdown Music Festival

Date: 27 December

Venue: Buffalo Park Cricket Stadium – East London

Time: 14h00

Fee: R170 – R170

 

Rocka Kasi Summer Picnic

Date: 27 December

Venue: Morula Sun, Mabopane

Time: 10h00

Fee: R120

 

Madiba the African Opera

Date: 27 December

Venue: S A State Theatre - Pretoria 

Time: 20h00

Fee: R100 – R180

 

Watershed Band! - Mossel Bay

Date: 29 December

Venue: Bravo Lounge - Garden Route Casino

Time: 15h00

Fee: R100 

 

Fact Durban Rocks New Year’s Eve

Date: 31 December

Venue: Meropa Casino - Polokwane

Time: 18h00

Fee: R200 – R1800

 

Nederburg New Year`s Eve Concert

Date: 31 December

Venue: Nederburg Wine Farm

Time: 21h30

Fee: R300

 

UMDM Midmar Music Festival

Date: 31 December

Venue: Midmar Dam, Howick

Time: 10h00

Fee: R100 – R500

 

2nd Mpumalanga Gospel Music Awards

Date: 31 December

Venue: A G S Communio Church, Nelspruit

Time: 18h00

Fee: R100 – R350

 

7th Annual Gospel All Stars

Date: 31 December

Venue: Durban Centrum Park

Time: 20h00

Fee: R100 – R250